Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

Adirondack chairs are probably the most popular kind of outdoor chair on the market.  They are very comfortable to sit in and are available in a variety of styles, shapes, sizes, and materials.  Many Adirondack lovers prefer wooden chairs over all the other materials used in construction.

There are several different types of wood that have been used to make Adirondack chairs. Each wood type has its advantages and disadvantages.  Below we have listed many of the common wood types that are used in construction and some information about each type.

  • Teak Wood Chairs – Teak is a strong hardwood that can last as long as 60-70 years even outside in extreme weather conditions. One of the contributing factors to this wood’s strength and durability is the special oil that is found in the heartwood.  Even in rough weather Teak will not rot, crack, or split.  It is also naturally insect resistant and requires very little maintenance and upkeep beyond applying a good sealant for teak wood annually to keep it looking its best. Teak is a great choice for those looking for durability and the ability to be left outside all year long.  Teak is more expensive than other woods due to the availability and demand for it, but it is well worth the cost since you won’t have to worry about replacing them even if they are sitting directly on soil.Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

 

  • Pine Wood Chairs – Pine Adirondack chairs are very popular due to their affordability. Many people like the bright look of unfinished pine. Over time it naturally fades to a silvery gray. Pine is one of the soft woods and can become dinged and scratched with use.  Another potential problem with pine is that it is susceptible to insects and rot if not maintained properly.  It is wise to re-finish them every year or two at the most to preserve the wood and keep it protected.  Refinishing, re-staining and then re-sealing them will keep them looking great for years.  If affordability is important to you and you don’t mind the upkeep, pine is an excellent choice.Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

 

  • Cedar Wood Chairs – Cedar is a popular wood that is somewhere between pine and teak. It is naturally resistant to insects and rotting and has a natural oil in its heartwood that protects it from insect infestations and decay.  Cedar Adirondack chairs are a great choice for those who live in wetter climates because the cedar tree adjusts to moist conditions. This makes this type of wood perfect for those who live in the Pacific Northwest regions.  Cedar also naturally fades to a weathered gray or you can apply stain and sealant to it to keep the red glow.  Cedar chairs are similar to pine in terms of cost.  If you don’t mind a little bit of maintenance here and there and you live in a wet climate and love the red color, cedar is perfect for you.Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

 

  • Oak Wood Chairs – One of the most popular woods on the market for many things is Oak and Adirondack chairs are no exception. Overall, oak is durable, solid, and gorgeous to look at but it is not very resistant to rain.  If oak is your favorite, make sure that you refinish, re-stain, and re0seal it often to preserve the beauty of the wood.  Being in direct sunlight can cause streaking or darkening of oak Adirondack chairs so place your chairs in a shady spot or use a sun-resistant stain on them.  Oak is comparable to cedar and pine in cost. If you are looking for outdoor furniture that is solid and heavy and you don’t mind putting in some time on maintenance, oak is the right choice for your chairs.Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs

 

  • Polywood Chairs – Polywood is not a true wood but many people can’t tell the difference if you purchase high quality Polywood chairs. This eco-friendly choice is made from recycled plastic. They are made from HDPE plastics that have been sanitized and pressed into board stock that is tough and durable. There are many benefits to using Polywood in addition to the fact that it reduces deforestation and reduces carbon dioxide levels as well.  It is also literally, maintenance-free, costs a lot less than teak wood chairs, and will not succumb to insects, splitting or rotting.  Another plus to Polywood is that you can choose from a variety of colors that will not fade in the sunlight.  Polywood chairs ARE more expensive than pine, cedar, and oak because they are so easy to care for and last a LONG time.  This is the perfect choice if you are looking for an Adirondack chair that requires NO maintenance, that will last a long time, and that can be left out in all types of weather without losing its beauty or brightness.Different Wood Types for Adirondack Chairs